The microbattery held about seven times the energy

July 20 [Sat], 2013, 10:33
Battery technology is advancing fast—just compare the Watt-hours you can stuff into current devices to what was on the market a few decades ago (the Powerbook 140 had a 4200 mAh battery, while the current iPad has nearly three times that capacity). Research is continuing to advance at a rapid pace, which is Brand new T410s why it sometimes seems like we cover a new miracle battery every month. We try to make it clear that most of these are still years away from commercialization, and some technologies will just never get there.

It's with that caution in mind that we turn to a battery development that was even picked up by the BBC earlier this week. In a new paper, researchers have reported that they are developing a microscopic battery that's suitable for integrating directly into electronics, just as capacitors now are. Compared to existing capacitors, its performance is impressive. That announcement doesn't mean, however, that these things can be scaled up to work as full-sized batteries that can power gadgets or cars. There are also a few hitches, like rapidly degrading performance, that need to be worked out.

That said, making the batteries is a pretty impressive process. In general, the batteries we buy are made from bulk processes, where materials self-organize into the different parts necessary to get the battery to work. This self-organization can be directed to a greater or lesser degree, but it's still dependent upon the material properties of the battery components.

When thinking about a battery that's small enough to integrate with current electronics, however, those sorts of considerations don't really apply. The electronics are already subject to step-by-step manufacturing processes, and the size of the battery means that bulk processes won't apply. So the researchers behind the new battery focused on structuring its parts on microscopic scales and made them to optimize performance. As a result, the batteries were built with a lot of active material relative to their volume and very short transport distances for the electrons and ions in the battery itself.

To build these microbatteries, the authors started out by laying out a series of tightly packed gold electrodes. They then layered tiny polystyrene pellets on top, which were packed down tightly. With the beads in place, the gold electrodes were used to electrodeposit nickel around the polystyrene beads, which created a metal foam precisely located above the gold electrodes. Once that was in place, the beads were etched away, leaving the metal scaffolding in place.

At this point, a second round of electrodepositing was done to create the anodes and cathodes at alternating electrodes. First, half the electrodes were charged to deposit a nickel-tin mixture at the anode; next, manganese dioxide was deposited at the other half to form the cathode. Lithium ions were then integrated into the resulting battery, and an electrolyte solution was layered on top. The end result was a series of alternating stripes, each about 30 micrometers wide, consisting of metal foams that allowed the rapid transport of ions in and out, and a direct connection to the gold electrodes below to transfer electrons.

Performance-wise, the result was pretty impressive. Like a battery, it stored far more energy than a supercapacitor. But because the ions and electrons could move so quickly, it had the power profile of a supercapacitor (power is the energy transferred per time), meaning that charging and discharging could occur at incredibly high rates. If you scaled this up to the size of a conventional lithium ion battery, the microbattery held about seven times the energy.

Those upsides are the good parts; unfortunately, there are a few downsides. One of them is that the battery loses about five percent of its capacity with each charge/discharge cycle. By 15 cycles, it was down to only two-thirds of its original capacity, and things were even worse at high charge/discharge rates. The authors think that this was a necessary part of the electrodes breaking in, and there may be a longer-term stability once that point is reached. But they didn't actually go on to demonstrate that hypothesis.

Other issues have to do with manufacturing and scaling. The demonstration system had a total volume of 0.03 cubic millimeters, so there's a lot of scaling up to do. And any scaling up will require that the multi-step production Brand new T420 process has to happen very efficiently and very cheaply.

This is a nice paper with some interesting ideas, but there's definitely some work to do before the technology could be ready for widespread use, and there are some problems that still need to be overcome before it's worth doing that work.

study done by Cadex to examine failed batteries

May 31 [Fri], 2013, 15:24
Li-ion batteries contain a protection circuit that shields the battery against abuse. This important safeguard has the disadvantage of turning the battery off if over-discharged, and storing a discharged battery for any length of A32-M50 laptop batterytime can do this. The self-discharge during storage gradually lowers the voltage of a battery that is already discharged; the protection circuit will eventually cut off between 2.20 and 2.90V/cell.

Some battery chargers and analyzers, including those made by Cadex, feature a wake-up feature or “boost” to reactivate and charge batteries that have fallen asleep. Without this feature, a charger would render these batteries as unserviceable and the packs would be discarded. The boost feature applies a small charge current to first activate the protection circuit and then commence with a normal charge.

Do not boot lithium-based batteries back to life that have dwelled below 1.5V/cell for a week or longer. Copper shunts may have formed inside the cells that can lead to a partial or total electrical short. When recharging, such a cell AP32-1008P laptop battery might become unstable, causing excessive heat or showing other anomalies. The “boost” function by Cadex halts the charge if the voltage does not rise normally.


A study done by Cadex to examine failed batteries reveals that three out of ten batteries are removed from service due to over-discharge. Furthermore, 90 percent of returned batteries have no fault or can easily be serviced. Lack of test devices at the customer service level is in part to blame for the high exchange rate. Refurbishing batteries saves money and protects the environment.

Congress banned the production of alkaline batteries

April 05 [Fri], 2013, 14:30
Although disposable, this battery is the most common type used in small household gadgets such as remote controls or battery-operated12 cells 43R1967 toothbrushes. They were popular back in the 1970's, and are substituted in place of the Carbon Zinc and Zinc Chloride batteries.

They are not ideal to use for digital cameras since they do not have good power surges. They still work, but its life will be short. Some manufacturers have made alkaline batteries, however, that can work well in high drain devices. They include Duracell Ultra, Energizer Advanced Formula, and Kodak Photolite.

Take note that there is not much difference from brand to brand since each battery uses the same chemicals. Comparison tests was done by Consumer Reports between different alkaline brands and showed that the best and worst batteries only differ between 9% - 15%.

In 1996, Congress banned the production of alkaline batteries containing the toxc metal mercury for obvious reasons, one being it is not safe to throw away in the trash bin. Now it is safe to do so with then exceptions of the button batteries, the ones found on wrist watches. Although there are special electronic places that takes in those batteries and safely disposes them.

Even though it is not recommendable to recharge alkaline, it is possible, provided that the right rechargeable device is used. If NiMH or NiCad recharger is used, the batteries may explode, especially with the newer high-drain 12 cells 40Y8318alkalines which is resistant to recharging. Standard alkaline batteries get lesser recharge cylcles than the rechargeable ones. It is recommended to keep the battery always charged for if it is kept drained too much, it may not be possible to recharge it.

Examples of Rechargeable batteries include Pure Energy

April 05 [Fri], 2013, 14:29
These batteries were supposed to bring the best of both worlds for alkaline. Its high capacity combined with its rechargeable nature makes is sound very good. However, it does not. Rechargeable Alkalines get fewer recharge12 cells 51J0499 cylcles in comparison to NiMH rechargeables. In fact, the Rechargeable Alkalines have lower starting capacity than the best NiMHs anyway.

Rechargeable Alkalines cannot be used in digital cameras since it is not a high-drain battery, and it also requires a special charger.

However, Rechargeable Alkalines do give out higher voltage than NiMH. This means that it performs great with devices that take in multiple batteries. For instance, LED flashlights gives out brighter light with the alkalines than with NiMH. With the infrequent use along with high self-discharge of the NiMH makes the batteries go dead on their own between periods of use.

Examples of Rechargeable batteries include Pure Energy and Accucell.

As mentioned with the regular alkaline, DO NOT charge batteries with any regular recharger for they may explode. Always keep the batteies "topped off" meaning the sooner it is recharged, the more recharge cycles and12 cells L08O6C02 more total power it can give throughout its lifetime.

There are no 9V rechargeable alkalines for two reasons. One being that they are made with six 1.5V-cells inside, therefore making it easy to access each cells for and reliably recharge them. It is harder to access the cells with the 9V. The other reason is that 9V batteries provides limited benefit in terms of cost savings for the products that run with them lasts more many months anyway.

Anytime your Mac has power management type issues

January 31 [Thu], 2013, 17:29
Ever since Mac OS X 10.6, if you have a portable Mac the battery menu will report to you the condition of your battery. There’s two messages you don’t really want to see though, and they are “Replace Now” and “Service 11.1v 5200mah 9cells PA3420U-1BRS”. Basically if a battery is unable to hold a charge, you’ll get one of these messages in your battery status indicator menu.

I’ve personally never seen “Replace Now” but on multiple machines I have encountered the “Service Battery” alert and in almost every case the battery needed to be replaced with a new one. In one odd circumstance though, the battery still worked fine but Mac OS X was reporting the error message anyway, the message was cleared and everything went back to normal after the SMC power management controller was reset. Anytime your Mac has power management type issues it’s worth giving the SMC reset a shot, it might fix the problem.

If you tried the SMC reset to no avail and you think your battery is toast or it’s just being problematic, give Apple a call or stop into an Apple Store. This is particularly helpful if the machine is reporting the “Service Battery” message, if the battery is in warranty they will replace it free of charge. There are even some 11.1v 5200mah 9cells PA3537U-1BRSsituations where they will replace out of warranty batteries too, but it’s a case-by-case basis and often relating to the cycle count and age of the battery. You can check your batteries functionality with a free utility called CoconutBattery.

Note that if your battery is removable you will have to pay a deposit

January 31 [Thu], 2013, 17:29
The service battery message is used by Mac OS X to let MacBook Pro users that the operating system believes the battery no longer holds a charge. However, before going out to the Apple store and buying a replacement 11.1v 5200mah 9cells satellite A200there are a few things worth trying to resolve the service battery message.

Checking your MacBook Pro’s Battery Cycles
The first step to take after seeing this message is to check your MacBook Pro’s battery cycles. This will give you an idea of how old the battery is and whether Apple will cover it under AppleCare. To access this click on the Apple logo on the top left of your computer and select About This Mac from the options. In the pop up window select “More info”. In this window select “Power” and you’ll see detailed information about your MacBook Pro’s battery. The cycle count shown is the number of times your computer has been fully drained and recharged.


If your MacBook Pro’s battery cycles are under 300 and your battery is under less than a year old, Apple will repair or replace your battery at no charge. Simply visit your local Apple Store or give Apple Care Support a call and explain that you’re seeing a service battery message. Note that if your battery is removable you will have to pay a deposit if you chose to do this via mail, but the deposit will be refunded once Apple receives your faulty battery. If your MacBook Pro is one of the newer unibody designs, you will have to mail your MacBook Pro in.

Calibrating your Battery
In the unfortunate scenario that your MacBook Pro’s battery is beyond 300 cycles or over a year old there’s still a few things worth trying before going out and buying a replacement. The first of these is to calibrate your battery. This is done simply by charging your battery fully and then letting the MacBook Pro run unplugged until no charge is left. Your MacBook Pro will go into sleep mode, but your 11.1v 5200mah 9cells PA3399U-2BAS still maintains a charge so you should allow the MacBook Pro to sleep for at least 5 hours.

Afterwards connect the power adaptor and allow the battery to recharge fully. Your battery is now calibrated and hopefully the service battery message has now disappeared.

Li-ion does not need to be fully charged

December 21 [Fri], 2012, 12:34
The charge rate of a typical consumer Li-ion battery is between 0.5 and 1C in Stage 1, and the charge time is about three hours. Manufacturers recommend charging the 18650 cell at 0.8C or less. Charge efficiency is 97 to 99 percent and the cell remains cool during charge. Some Li-ion packs may experience anew T410 temperature rise of about 5ºC (9ºF) when reaching full charge.

This could be due to the protection circuit and/or elevated internal resistance. Full charge occurs when the battery reaches the voltage threshold and the current drops to three percent of the rated current. A battery is also considered fully charged if the current levels off and cannot go down further. Elevated self-discharge might be the cause of this condition.

Increasing the charge current does not hasten the full-charge state by much. Although the battery reaches the voltage peak quicker with a fast charge, the saturation charge will take longer accordingly. The amount of charge current applied simply alters the time required for each stage; Stage 1 will be shorter but the saturation Stage 2 will take longer. A high current charge will, however, quickly fill the battery to about 70 percent.

Li-ion does not need to be fully charged, as is the case with lead acid, nor is it desirable to do so. In fact, it is better not to fully charge, because high voltages stresses the battery. Choosing a lower voltage threshold, or eliminating the saturation charge altogether, prolongs battery life but this reduces the runtime. Since the consumer market promotes maximum runtime, these chargers go for maximum capacity rather than extended service life.

Some lower-cost consumer chargers may use the simplified “charge-and-run” method that charges a lithium-ion battery in one hour or less without going to the Stage 2 saturation charge. “Ready” appears when thereplacement battery for T410sreaches the voltage threshold at Stage 1. Since the state-of-charge (SoC) at this point is only about 85 percent, the user may complain of short runtime, not knowing that the charger is to blame. Many warranty batteries are being replaced for this reason, and this phenomenon is especially common in the cellular industry.

Avoiding full charge has benefits, and some manufacturers set the charge threshold lower on purpose to prolong battery life. Table 2 illustrates the estimated capacities when charged to different voltage thresholds with and without saturation charge.

Instead the batteries produce power from charged particles

November 15 [Thu], 2012, 11:44
It is getting harder to deny that nuclear poweredbright 51J0497are a logical source of energy going into the future. They serve not only to protect declining natural resources but to make our traditional energy sources redundant. If the last century has thought us anything however it is to be very afraid of the word nuclear and to avoid it, and anyone who plays with it, at all costs.

In fact it comes across as rather hypocritical to hear that the western hemisphere continues to experiment with the capabilities of nuclear power, while concurrently dusting every square inch of the Middle East to ensure a safer world.

But aside from that, nuclear batteries that can last hundreds of years can be of great benefit to society and if distributed carefully, can benefit our environment. By cutting back on the burning of fossil fuels such as oil and coal, we can significantly reduce the amount of harmful emissions which are being constantly pumped into the atmosphere in order to maintain our modern lifestyles. Unlike nuclear reactors at large power plants, these tiny batteries do not produce energy by way of a reaction and therefore do not create radioactive waste products.

Instead the batteries produce power from charged particles released from radioactive decay. Scientists have recently overcome a major stumbling block to make the mass production of these nuclear batteries a feasible alternative. Before this discovery radioactive decay not only harnessed energy, but simultaneously damaged the outer shell of the battery.

This problem made the theoretic long life span obsolete and made the battery potentially dangerous. However, scientists have since equipped the battery with a liquid semiconductor that can protect thecheap 51J0499 for the duration of its life. Thus, if the batteries are made and distributed safely there is absolutely no environmental concern.

However the production and delivery of any mass made product can never be 100 per cent guaranteed, and unfortunately this is one product that requires such a cast iron promise.

Nuclear batteries can contain thousands of times more energy

November 15 [Thu], 2012, 11:42
One of our listeners – Bruno Garcia – asked us to talk about nuclear (atomic) batteries. These devices make use of the energy that radioactive isotopes emit on a continuous basis to provide heat and electricity for devices that replacement PA3450U-1BRSneed to operate for a long period of time.

With the right isotope, nuclear batteries can contain thousands of times more energy per unit mass than chemical batteries. They have been used by NASA for space research, by the Coast Guard for remote navigation devices and by medical equipment suppliers to power pacemakers.

Shane and I were happy to oblige and enjoyed our conversation. We hope you do too. Here are some additional links to other high quality PA3451U-1BRSsources of information about this fascinating and valuable use of nuclear materials.

Many warranty batteries are being replaced for this reason

September 13 [Thu], 2012, 15:18
Charging and discharging batteries is a chemical reaction, but Li-ion is claimed as an exception. Here, 9cells Pavilion g61 batteryscientists talk about energies flowing in and out as part of ion movement between anode and cathode. This claim has merits, but if the scientists were totally right then the battery would live forever, and this is wishful thinking. The experts blame capacity fade on ions getting trapped. For simplicity, we consider aging a corrosion that affects all battery systems.

The Li‑ion charger is a voltage-limiting device that is similar to the lead acid system. The difference lies in a higher voltage per cell, tighter voltage tolerance and the absence of trickle or float charge at full charge. While lead acid offers some flexibility in terms of voltage cut‑off, manufacturers of Li‑ion cells are very strict on the correct setting because Li-ion cannot accept overcharge. The so-called miracle charger that promises to prolong battery life and methods that pump extra capacity into the cell do not exist here. Li-ion is a “clean” system and only takes what it can absorb. Anything extra causes stress.

Most cells charge to 4.20V/cell with a tolerance of +/–50mV/cell. Higher voltages could increase the capacity, but the resulting cell oxidation would reduce service life. More important is the safety concern if charging beyond 4.20V/cell. Figure 1 shows the voltage and current signature as lithium-ion passes through the stages for constant current and topping charge.

Li-ion is fully charged when the current drops to a predetermined level or levels out at the end of Stage 2. In lieu of trickle charge, some chargers apply a topping charge when the voltage drops to 4.05V/cell (Stage 4).

Courtesy of Cadex
The charge rate of a typical consumer Li-ion battery is between 0.5 and 1C in Stage 1, and the charge time is about three hours. Manufacturers recommend charging the 18650 cell at 0.8C or less. Charge efficiency is 97 to 99 percent and the cell remains cool during charge. Some Li-ion packs may experience a temperature rise of about 5ºC (9ºF) when reaching full charge. This could be due to the protection circuit and/or elevated internal resistance. Full charge occurs when the battery reaches the voltage threshold and the current drops to three percent of the rated current. A battery is also considered fully charged if the current levels off and cannot go down further. Elevated self-discharge might be the cause of this condition.

Increasing the charge current does not hasten the full-charge state by much. Although the battery reaches the voltage peak quicker with a fast charge, the saturation charge will take longer accordingly. The amount of charge current applied simply alters the time required for each stage; Stage 1 will be shorter but the saturation Stage 2 will take longer. A high current charge will, however, quickly fill the battery to about 70 percent.

Li-ion does not need to be fully charged, as is the case with lead acid, nor is it desirable to do so. In fact, it is better not to fully charge, because high voltages stresses the battery. Choosing a lower voltage threshold, or eliminating the saturation charge altogether, prolongs battery life but this reduces the runtime. Since the consumer market promotes maximum runtime, these chargers go for maximum cheap rn873 HSTNN-UB72capacity rather than extended service life.

Some lower-cost consumer chargers may use the simplified “charge-and-run” method that charges a lithium-ion battery in one hour or less without going to the Stage 2 saturation charge. “Ready” appears when the battery reaches the voltage threshold at Stage 1. Since the state-of-charge (SoC) at this point is only about 85 percent, the user may complain of short runtime, not knowing that the charger is to blame. Many warranty batteries are being replaced for this reason, and this phenomenon is especially common in the cellular industry.
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