As long as the battery is an electrochemical process

June 14 [Fri], 2013, 11:13
The battery dictates the speed with which mobility advances. So important is this portable energy source that any incremental improvement Presario A900 bright opens new doors for many products. The better the battery, the greater our liberty will become.

Besides packing more energy into the battery, engineers have also made strides in reducing power consumption of portable equipment. These advancements go hand-in-hand with longer runtimes but are often counteracted by the demand for additional features and more power.
The end result is similar runtimes but enhanced performance.

The battery has not advanced at the same speed as microelectronics, and the industry has only gained 8 to 10 percent in capacity per year during the last two decades. This is a far cry from Moore’s Law* that specifies a doubling of the number of transistors in an integrated circuit every two years. Instead of two years, the capacity of lithium-ion took 10 years to double.

In parallel with achieving capacity gain, battery makers must also focus on improving manufacturing methods to ensure better safety. The recent recall of millions of lithium-cobalt packs caused by thermal runaway is a reminder of the inherent risk in condensing too much energy into a small package. Better manufacturing practices should make such recalls a thing of the past. A generation of Li-ion Presario C700 bright is emerging that are built for longevity. These batteries have a lower specific energy (capacity) than those for portable electronics and are increasingly being considered for the electric powertrain of vehicles.

People want an inexhaustible pool of energy in a package that is small, cheap, safe and clean, and the battery industry can only fulfill this desire partially. As long as the battery is an electrochemical process, there will be limitations on capacity and life span. Only a revolutionary new storage system could satisfy the unquenchable thirst for mobile power, and it’s anyone’s guess whether this will be lithium-air, the fuel cell, or some other ground-breaking new power generator, such as atomic fusion. For most of us, the big break might not come in our lifetime.

Nicola Tesla began demonstrating wireless broadcasting

June 14 [Fri], 2013, 11:12
Wireless charging may one day replace plugs and wires similar to how Wi-Fi and Bluetooth have modernized personal communication. Wireless charging with inductive coupling uses an electromagnetic field that transfers energy from the transmitter to the receiver. Consumers are wild about the convenience of XPS 14 bright simply placing a portable device on a charging mat. Wireless charging works well with mobile phones, digital cameras, media players, gaming controllers and Bluetooth headsets. Other potential applications are power tools, medical devices, e-bikes and electric cars (EVs).

Wireless transfer of power is not new. In 1831, Michael Faraday discovered induction and stated that electromagnetic forces can travel through space. In the late 1800s and early 1900s, Nicola Tesla began demonstrating wireless broadcasting and power transmission. Early experiments in Colorado Springs in 1899 lead to the Wardenclyffe Tower in New York — Tesla was adamant to prove that electrical power could be transmitted without wires, but a lack of funding halted the project.

It was not until the 1920s that public broadcasting began, and Europe built massive AM transmitters with signal strengths to penetrate many countries. The transmitter at Beromünster in Switzerland (Figure 1) could have transmitted at 600kW, but legislation on electro-smog and protests from the local population limited the power to 180kW. Smaller FM stations have since replaced these large national transmitters.

How does wireless charging relate to radio transmission? Both models are similar in that they transmit power by electro-magnetic waves. Wireless charging operates in a near field condition in which the primary coil produces a magnetic field that is picked up by the secondary coil in close proximity.

The radio transmitter works on the far field principle by sending waves that travel through space. While the receiving coil of the wireless XPS 17 bright charger captures most of the energy generated, the receiving antenna of the radio needs only a few microvolt (one millionth of a volt) to rise the signal above the noise level and receive clear intelligence when amplified.

The battery has not advanced at the same speed as microelectronics

April 18 [Thu], 2013, 11:44
The battery dictates the speed with which mobility advances. So important is this portable energy source that any incremental iThe battery dictates the speed with which mobility advances. So important is this portable energy source that any incremental improvement opens new doors for many products. The better the 12 cells 1000 , the greater our liberty will become.
Besides packing more energy into the battery, engineers have also made strides in reducing power consumption of portable equipment. These advancements go hand-in-hand with longer runtimes but are often counteracted by the demand for additional features and more power.
The end result is similar runtimes but enhanced performance.

The battery has not advanced at the same speed as microelectronics, and the industry has only gained 8 to 10 percent in capacity per year during the last two decades. This is a far cry from Moore’s Law* that specifies a doubling of the number of transistors in an integrated circuit every two years. Instead of two years, the capacity of lithium-ion took 10 years to double.

In parallel with achieving capacity gain, battery makers must also focus on improving manufacturing methods to ensure better safety. The recent recall of millions of lithium-cobalt packs caused by thermal runaway is a reminder of the inherent risk in condensing too much energy into a small package. Better manufacturing practices should make such recalls a thing of the past. A generation of Li-ion batteries is emerging that are built for longevity. These batteries have a lower specific energy (capacity) than those for portable electronics and are increasingly being considered for the electric powertrain of vehicles.

People want an inexhaustible pool of energy in a package that is small, cheap, safe and clean, and the battery industry can only fulfill this desire partially. As long as the battery is an electrochemical process, there will be limitations on capacity and life span. Only a revolutionary new storage system could satisfy the unquenchable thirst for mobile power, and it’s anyone’s guess whether this will be lithium-air, the fuel cell, or some other ground-breaking new power generator, such as atomic fusion. For most of us, the big break might not come in our lifetime.mprovement opens new doors for many products. The better the battery, the greater our liberty will become.

Besides packing more energy into the battery, engineers have also made strides in reducing power consumption of portable equipment. These advancements go hand-in-hand with longer runtimes but are often counteracted by the demand for additional features and more power.
The end result is similar runtimes but enhanced performance.

The battery has not advanced at the same speed as microelectronics, and the industry has only gained 8 to 10 percent in capacity per year during the last two decades. This is a far cry from Moore’s Law* that specifies a doubling of the number of transistors in an integrated circuit every two years. Instead of two years, the capacity of lithium-ion took 10 years to double.

In parallel with achieving capacity gain, battery makers must also focus on improving manufacturing methods to ensure better safety. The recent recall of millions of lithium-cobalt packs caused by thermal runaway is a reminder of the inherent risk in condensing too much energy into a small package. Better manufacturing practices should make such recalls a thing of the past. A generation of Li-ion 12 cells 513775-001 is emerging that are built for longevity. These batteries have a lower specific energy (capacity) than those for portable electronics and are increasingly being considered for the electric powertrain of vehicles.

People want an inexhaustible pool of energy in a package that is small, cheap, safe and clean, and the battery industry can only fulfill this desire partially. As long as the battery is an electrochemical process, there will be limitations on capacity and life span. Only a revolutionary new storage system could satisfy the unquenchable thirst for mobile power, and it’s anyone’s guess whether this will be lithium-air, the fuel cell, or some other ground-breaking new power generator, such as atomic fusion. For most of us, the big break might not come in our lifetime.

Most consumers are satisfied with the battery performance on portable devices

April 18 [Thu], 2013, 11:41
Lithium-ion is the battery of choice for consumer products, and no other systems threaten to interfere with its dominance at this time. The lead acid market is similar in size to Li-ion. Here the applications are divided into SLI (starter battery) for automotive, stationary for power backup, and deep-cycle for wheeled 12 cells 537626-001mobility such as golf cars, wheelchairs and scissor lifts. Lead acid holds a solid position, as it has done for the last hundred years. There are no other systems that threaten to unseat this forgiving and low-cost chemistry any time soon.

High specific energy and long storage has made alkaline more popular than carbon-zinc, which Georges Leclanché invented in 1868. The environmentally benign nickel-metal-hydride (NiMH) continues to hold an important role, as it replaces many applications previously served by nickel-cadmium (NiCd). However, at only three percent market share, NiMH is a minor player in the battery world and will likely relinquish more of its market to Li-ion by 2015.
Developing nations will contribute to future battery sales, and new markets are the electric bicycle in Asia and storage batteries to supply electric power to remote communities in Africa and other parts of the world. Wind turbines, solar power and other renewable sources also use storage batteries for load leveling. The large grid storage batteries used for load leveling collect surplus energy from renewable resources during high activity and supply extra power on heavy user demand. Read more about Batteries for Stationary, Grid Storage.

A major new battery user might be the electric powertrain for personal cars. However, battery cost and longevity will dictate how quickly the automotive sector will adopt this new propulsion system. Energy from oil is cheap, convenient and readily available; any alternative faces difficult challenges. Government incentives may be provided, but such intervention distorts the true cost of energy, shields the underlying problem with fossil fuel and only satisfies certain lobby groups through short-term solutions.

During the last five years or so, no new battery system has emerged that can claim to offer disruptive technology. Although much research is being done, no new concept is ready to enter the market at the time of writing, nor are new developments close to breakthrough point.

There are many reasons for this apparent lack of progress: few products have requirements that are as stringent as the battery. For example, battery users want low price, long life, high specific energy, safe operation and minimal maintenance. In addition, the battery must work at hot and cold temperatures, deliver high power on demand and charge quickly. Only some of these attributes are12 cells 572032-001 achievable with various battery technologies.

Most consumers are satisfied with the battery performance on portable devices. Today’s battery technology also serves power backup and wheeled mobility reasonably well. Using our current battery technology for electric powertrains on cars, however, might prove difficult because the long-term effects in that environment are not fully understood. The switch to a power source offering a fraction of the kinetic energy compared to fossil fuels will be an eye-opener for motorists who continually demand larger vehicles with more. Read more about the Cost of Power.

Batteries are gradually getting better

February 28 [Thu], 2013, 14:55
In Europe, where electricity is produced in a number of different ways, electric cars do offer environmental benefits when compared withcheap rn873 A32-M50 cars with internal combustion engines, according to the study.

"Electric vehicles powered by the present European electricity mix offer a 10% to 24% decrease in their global warming potential relative to conventional diesel or petrol vehicles."

This is in line with calculations made by some carmakers.


Longer lives
The report pointed out that the longer an electric car in Europe stays mobile, the greater its "lead" over petrol and diesel engines.

"Assuming a vehicle lifetime of 200,000km exaggerates the global warming benefits of electric vehicles to 27-29% relative to petrol and 17-20% relative to diesel," it said.

"An assumption of 100,000km decreases the benefit of electric vehicles to 9-14% with respect to petrol vehicles and results in impacts indistinguishable from those of a diesel vehicle."

An electric car's longevity depends a great deal on how long its battery lasts, not least since it is very expensive to replace them.

Batteries are gradually getting better, which could result in electric cars being used for longer.

However, as petrol and diesel engines are also improving, the relationships between the different types of vehicles are not constant.

"A more significant reduction in global warming could potentially be achieved by increasing fuel efficiency or shifting from petrol to diesel," the report said.

"If you are considering purchasing an electric vehicle for its environmental benefits, first check your electricity source and second look cheap rn873 AP32-1008Pclosely at the warranty on the batteries," said Professor Stromman.

Those in power, meanwhile, should recognise "the many potential advantages of electric vehicles [which] should serve as a motivation for cleaning up regional electricity mixes".

The polymer gel looks like a solid film

February 28 [Thu], 2013, 14:52
The newly developed jelly batteries should prevent "thermal runaway", during which batteries can reach hundreds of degrees cheap rn873 A32-F52and catch fire.

The Leeds-based researchers are promising that their jelly batteries are as safe as polymer batteries, perform like liquid-filled batteries, but are 10 to 20% the price of either.

The secret to their success lies in blending a rubber-like polymer with a conductive, liquid electrolyte into a thin, flexible film of gel that sits between the battery electrodes.

"The polymer gel looks like a solid film, but it actually contains about 70% liquid electrolyte," explained the study's lead author, Professor Ian Ward from the University of Leeds.

"The remarkable thing is that we can make the separation between the solid and liquid phase at the point that it hits thecheap rn873 A32-F82 electrodes.

"Safety is of paramount importance in lithium batteries. Conventional lithium batteries use electrolytes based on organic liquids; this is what you see burning in pictures of lithium batteries that catch fire. Replacing liquid electrolytes by a polymer or gel electrolyte should improve safety and lead to an all-solid-state cell," said Professor Peter Bruce from the University of St Andrews, who was not involved in the study.

In 2010 the Battery Council celebrated its 85th anniversary

November 29 [Thu], 2012, 12:06
Look to us for information and the latest news on how lead-acid batteries are being used in environmentally friendly practices such as recycling and hybrid car production, as well as in workhorse and mission-critical situations Look to us for information and the latest news on how lead-acid batteries are being used in environmentally friendly practices such as recycling and hybrid car production, as well asbright Pavilion 4710s battery in workhorse and mission-critical situations that require a truly dependable power source, such as the backup generating system at your local hospital.

BCI is a not-for-profit organization whose mission is to promote the interests of the international lead-acid battery industry. With more than 250 members worldwide, BCI brings together representatives of many of the kinds of businesses that are involved in the lead-acid battery life cycle, including manufacturers and recyclers, marketers and retailers, suppliers of raw materials and equipment, and industry consultants.

In 2010 the Battery Council celebrated its 85th anniversary and the 150th anniversary of the development of the lead-acid battery business. Select from one of the links above to learn about BCI's goals, how to contact us, or to learn more about lead-acid battery business.that require a truly dependable power source, such as the backup generating system at your local hospital.

BCI is a not-for-profit organization whose mission is to promote the interests of the international lead-acid battery industry. With more than 250 members worldwide, BCI brings together representatives of many of the kinds of businesses that are involved in the lead-acid battery life cycle, including manufacturers and 11.1v 5200mah 9cells HSTNN-DB73recyclers, marketers and retailers, suppliers of raw materials and equipment, and industry consultants.

In 2010 the Battery Council celebrated its 85th anniversary and the 150th anniversary of the development of the lead-acid battery business. Select from one of the links above to learn about BCI's goals, how to contact us, or to learn more about lead-acid battery business.

Many perceive a battery as being an energy storage device

October 08 [Mon], 2012, 18:15
Many perceive a battery as being an energy storage device that is similar to a fuel tank dispensing liquid fuel. For simplicity, a battery can be seen as such; however, measuring stored energy from an electrochemical device ishp envy 537627-001 battery far more complex. The process is fraught with confusion, is poorly understood, and this article describes the challenges of measuring energy from a battery.

Before looking into the fuel gauge concept deeper, we assume that state-of-charge (SoC) is the relative stored energy in a battery that can be released under prevailing conditions. The prevailing conditions are mostly unknown to the battery user, and besides SoC they include the actual battery capacity, load currents and operating temperature. State-of-function (SoF), the all-encompassing criteria that includes SoC, capacity and delivery, is difficult to measure and remains mostly guesswork. Considering these limitations, one can appreciate why most battery fuel gauges are inaccurate.

Unlike a fuel tank that has a known volumetric dimension, the fuel gauge of a battery has unconfirmed definitions. Other than the open circuit voltage (OCV), which only approximates SoC, a battery does not have fundamental internal parameters that relate to SoC. The Ah rating, which the manufacturer specifies, only applies for the short time when the battery is new. In essence, a battery is a shrinking vessel that takes less energy with each subsequent charge, and the stated Ah rating is only a reference of what the battery should be holding. The battery is not an energy container per se that guarantees a given amount of energy under all conditions but exhibits a human quality delivering on prevailing situations.

A common error in fuel gauge design is ignoring the aging aspect by assuming that the battery will stay perfect. Such oversight will limit the service to about two years before the readings become inaccurate. The scaling of most fuel gauges is analogous to liquid fuel: full charge indicates 100% and empty is zero percent. Zero is the point when the battery reaches the low voltage knee at the end of discharge.

Discharging a battery rated at 1Ah should provide a current of 1A for one hour. This only holds true while the battery is new and discharged at room temperature. If the capacity shrinks to 50%, the fuel gauge of a fully charged battery will still show 100% but the expected one-hour runtime is reduced to 30 minutes.

Running the battery below freezing reduces the time further. For the casual cellphone or laptop user, this error only causes inconvenience; however, the problem becomes more evident with electric vehicles and other critical battery operated devices that depend on the remaining runtime to reach the destination.

Modern fuel gauges adapt to prevailing conditions by “learning” how much energy the battery was able to deliver on the previous discharge. Learning, or trending, may also include charge time because a faded battery charges quicker than a good one. It is also common to measure the internal battery resistance by observing the voltage drop; however, capacity estimation based on raising original 586029-001resistance no longer works well because the modern Li-ion maintains low resistance through most of its service life.

Capacity is best measured by discharging a fully charged battery at a constant current and reading the elapsed time. Most rechargeable batteries for portable use are specified at 1C discharge. A battery rated at 1Ah would therefore discharge at 1A. The rated discharge of primary cells, such as alkaline, is much lower. Measuring battery capacity by discharge/charge is impractical and stresses the battery.

A battery works best when warm

October 08 [Mon], 2012, 18:14
Measuring stored energy in an electrochemical device, such as a battery, is complex and state-of-charge (SoC) readings on a fuel gauge provide only a rough estimate. Users often compare battery SoC with the fuel gauge of a vehicle. Calculating fluid in a tank is simple because a liquid is a tangible entity; battery state-of-charge is not. Nor can the energy stored in a battery be quantified becauseprebattery for 497694-001vailing conditions such as load current and operating temperature influence its release.

A battery works best when warm; performance suffers when it is cold. In addition, a battery loses capacity through aging.

Current fuel gauge technologies are fraught with limitations and this came to light when users of the new iPad assumed that a 100 percent charge on the fuel gauge should also relate to a fully charged battery. This is not always so and users complained that the battery was only at 90 percent.

The modern fuel gauge used in iPads, smartphones and laptops read SoC through coulomb counting and voltage comparison. The complexity lies in managing these variables when the battery is in use. Applying a charge or discharge acts like a rubber band, pulling the voltage up or down, making a calculated SoC reading meaningless.

In open circuit condition, as is the case when measuring a naked battery, a voltage reference may be used; however temperature and battery age will affect the reading. The open terminal voltage as a SoC reference is only reliable when including these environmental conditions and allowing the battery to rest for a few hours before the measurement.

In the case of the iPad, a 10 percent discrepancy between fuel gauge and true battery SoC is acceptable for consumer products. The accuracy will likely drop further with use, and depending on the effectiveness of a self-learning algorithm, battery aging can add another 20-30 percent to the error. By this time the user has gotten used to the quirks of the device and the oddity is mostly forgotten or accepted.

While differences in the runtime cause only a mild inconvenience to a casual user, industrial applications, such as the electric powertrain in an electric vehicle, will need a better system. Improvements are in the work, and these developments may one day also benefit consumer products.

Coulomb counting is the heart of today’s fuel gauge. The theory goes back 250 years when Charles-Augustin de Coulomb first hp 593562-001 laptop batteryestablished the “Coulomb Rule.” It works on the principle of measuring in-and-out flowing currents.

Coulomb counting also produces errors; the outflowing energy is always less than what goes in. Inefficiencies in charge acceptance, especially towards the end of charge, tracking errors, as well as losses during discharge and self-discharge while in storage contribute to this. Self-learning and periodic calibrations through a full charge/discharge assure an accuracy most can live with.

The end result is similar runtimes but enhanced performance

August 08 [Wed], 2012, 12:41
The battery dictates the speed with which mobility advances. So important is this portable energy source that any incremental improvement opens new doors for many products. The better the battery, the greater our liberty will become.

Besides packing more energy into the 11.1v 5200mah 9cells VGP-BPL11, engineers have also made strides in reducing power consumption of portable equipment. These advancements go hand-in-hand with longer runtimes but are often counteracted by the demand for additional features and more power.
The end result is similar runtimes but enhanced performance.

The battery has not advanced at the same speed as microelectronics, and the industry has only gained 8 to 10 percent in capacity per year during the last two decades. This is a far cry from Moore’s Law* that specifies a doubling of the number of transistors in an integrated circuit every two years. Instead of two years, the capacity of lithium-ion took 10 years to double.

In parallel with achieving capacity gain, battery makers must also focus on improving manufacturing methods to ensure better safety. The recent recall of millions of lithium-cobalt packs caused by thermal runaway is a reminder of the inherent risk in condensing too much energy into a small package. Better manufacturing practices should make such recalls a thing of the past. A generation of Li-ionVGP-BPL2 laptop batteryis emerging that are built for longevity. These batteries have a lower specific energy (capacity) than those for portable electronics and are increasingly being considered for the electric powertrain of vehicles.

People want an inexhaustible pool of energy in a package that is small, cheap, safe and clean, and the battery industry can only fulfill this desire partially. As long as the battery is an electrochemical process, there will be limitations on capacity and life span. Only a revolutionary new storage system could satisfy the unquenchable thirst for mobile power, and it’s anyone’s guess whether this will be lithium-air, the fuel cell, or some other ground-breaking new power generator, such as atomic fusion. For most of us, the big break might not come in our lifetime.






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