You are probably wondering which type of battery to get

July 26 [Fri], 2013, 16:10
Throughout the years there have been many technologies involved with notebooks, and laptop batteries are no different. There are actually three distinct notebook battery types on the market today. Knowing the lithium A32-K52 difference between them will help you decide on exactly what to get when the time comes for a purchase.

In this article I will discuss the three different laptop battery types, as well as some of the advantages each one carries.

Nickel Cadmium - NiCd batteries were actually the first rechargeable laptop batteries ever. Manufactures loved them because their cost was relatively low and they had a high output. You won't find Nickel Cadmium batteries being used anymore, due to them being heavier and not as efficient as the newer laptop batteries.

Nickel Metal Hydride - NiMH batteries can still be found all over the place -- particularly for older model laptops. The rechargeable NiMH laptop battery was a big step up for notebook technology mostly in part because they were more reliable than the NiCd batteries, and they had an even higher output. The NiMH battery was also cheaper to produce, and safer to use.

The only issue with NiMH batteries is that they can have a memory effect. Basically, if you don't fully discharge the battery, it can remember this and leave you with a less than perfect battery output.

Lithium Ion - LiON batteries are now used in most new laptops. Unlike the NiMH battery, LiON laptop batteries have no memory effect. LiON batteries are also lighter than both NiCd and NiMH notebook batteries. Both of these advantages equal out to the Lithium Ion battery being the most popular and most lithium Presario CQ70 expensive among the various notebook power sources.

You are probably wondering which type of battery to get. Getting a Lithium Ion battery would be the best solution, and if you have the money that is what I recommend. If you cannot afford a LiON battery or your notebook is not compatible with one, then getting a NiMH battery is the next best thing.

Later cell technologies include zinc air

July 26 [Fri], 2013, 16:09

These are not normally used as a main power source for audio or video equipment, but are often used in auxiliary devices, e.g. remote wireless or infrared controllers, microphones, etc. There are many different chemical systems lithium A32-F52 employed in these cells, some using very expensive components.


The requirement for, say, a clock battery, which will be expected to supply a comparatively low amount of energy for a year or so, is different than that required for a battery powering a digital camera with a flash lamp, which has to supply pulses of relatively high power. Within many electronic devices, for example real time clock circuitry and memory maintenance circuitry, there is a requirement for primary cells which will supply a low amount of power for ten or so years.

A few advantages of primary cells are that they are easily available, at least in the standard consumer sizes, have a long shelf life and a high power density.

As an emergency backup, then it can be useful to have a battery pack which will take standard primary cells, but chose an easily available cell size, AA, C or D

Originally, (well, in my childhood days) most primary cells were of zinc-carbon construction. A later development was zinc chloride which has a greater capacity, whereas now most primary cells are of alkaline construction. However, in some situations the high capacity of the alkaline cells can cause a hazard due to sparking on installation. For example, a standard alkaline Duracell D cell has a capacity of lithium A32-F82 18000mAh, and therefore Zinc based cells are still used in hazardous situations.

Later cell technologies include zinc air, which provide energy only when a protective seal is removed and they thus have a very defined operational life. Other chemistries include silver oxide, mercury, and a whole range of lithium based cells, such as lithium iron sulphide, lithium manganese dioxide and lithium thionyl chloride. These cells are usually highly matched to a particular application, and give a saving in size and weight (but not usually cost) when compared with an alkaline cell of the same capacity

Researchers in Texas are working on a kind of battery

June 07 [Fri], 2013, 17:40
Other battery experts welcomed the team's efforts but said it could prove hard to bring the technology to market.

"The challenge is to make a microbattery array that is robust enough and that does not have a single short circuit in the whole array via a process that can be scaled up cheaply," said Prof Clare Grey from the University of X220 9cells Cambridge's chemistry department.

University of Oxford's Prof Peter Edwards - an expert in inorganic chemistry and energy - also expressed doubts.

"This is a very exciting development which demonstrates that high power densities are achievable by such innovations," he said.

"The challenges are: scaling this up to manufacturing levels; developing a simpler fabrication route; and addressing safety issues.

"I'd want to know if these microbatteries would be more prone to the self-combustion issues that plagued lithium-cobalt oxide batteries which we've seen become an issue of concern with Boeing's Dreamliner jets."
Prof William King Prof William King hopes to use the microbattery to power electronic equipment before the end of the year

He said that in the test equipment only a microscopic amount of the liquid was used, making the risk of an explosion negligible - but if it were scaled up to large sizes the danger could become "significant".

However, he added that he soon planned to switch to a safer polymer-based electrolyte to address the issue.

Prof King added that he hoped to have the technology ready to be trialled as a power source for electronic equipment before the end of the year.

The University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign X220i 9cellsteam is one of several groups attempting to overhaul the way we power gadgets.

Researchers in Texas are working on a kind of battery that can be spray-painted onto any surface while engineers at the University of Bedfordshire are exploring the idea of using radio waves as an energy source.

The lithium ion battery has run its course

April 13 [Sat], 2013, 11:36
On the commercial market, lithium ion batteries are generally ones small enough to fit into cellphones. But to power bigger items -- from a Prius to a 787 -- they get grouped together, increasing the juice they store and provide. ThatOn the commercial market, lithium ion batteries are generally ones small enough to fit into cellphones. But to power bigger items -- from a Prius to a 787 -- they get groupedOriginal Envy 14 together, increasing the juice they store and provide. That also increases the safety risk, experts say. The lithium ion battery that caught fire in a Boeing 787 weighed 63 pounds and was 19 inches long.

"You can't get around the fundamental thing is that lithium ion batteries are stuffed full of flammable liquid," Whitacre said.
Even one-in-a-million problems with lithium ion batteries can result in many fires because there are billions of them in use now, with dozens sometimes stacked together in a single device.

Experts say lithium ion batteries are more dangerous because their electrolyte, the liquid that allows ions to move between electrodes in the battery, is more flammable than the substance in older type batteries. Those older types include the lead-acid batteries in most cars and the nickel cadmium batteries that are often in video equipment and power tools.
Still, MIT materials science and engineering professor Gerbrand Ceder and others said the safety problems can be fixed.
Change doesn't come often in the battery field.

"The big advances in battery technology happen rarely. It's been more than 200 years and we have maybe five different successful rechargeable batteries," said George Blomgren, a former senior technology researcher at Eveready and now a private battery consultant. "It's frustrating."
Alessandro Volta -- for whom the volt is named -- invented the first useful battery in 1800. That was long before other breakthrough inventions like the internal combustion engine, telephone, car, airplane, transistor, computer and Internet. But all of those developments have seemed to evolve faster than the simple battery.
The lead-acid car battery "has been around for 150 years more or less," Whitacre said. "This is a remarkable testament to first how robust that chemistry is and how difficult change is."

Battery experts are split over what's next. Some think the lithium ion battery can be tinkered with to get major efficiency and storage improvements. Amatucci said he thinks we can get two to three times more energy out of future lithium ion batteries, while others said minor chemical changes can do even more.
But just as many engineers say the lithium ion battery has run its course.
"With the materials in the current lithium ion battery, we are definitely plateaued," Blomgren said. "We're waiting for something to come along that really does the job."
There are all sorts of new type batteries being worked on: lithium-air, lithium-sulfur, magnesium, sodium-ion.
"Right now it's a horse race," Blomgren said. "There's deficiencies in every technology that's out there. Each one of them requires a major solution."
One of the nation's best hopes for a breakthrough, said Battaglia, is John Goodenough, the man responsible for the 1979 breakthrough that led the first commercial lithium ion battery in 1991. He will receive the National Medal of Science at the White House next month.
Goodenough is 90.

"I'm working on it," Goodenough, an engineering professor at the University of Texas at Austin, said Tuesday. "I'm optimistic in a sense that I'm willing to keep working on it. I think we can do some interesting things." also increases the safety risk, experts say. The lithium ion battery that caught fire in a Boeing 787 weighed 63 pounds and was 19 inches long.

"You can't get around the fundamental thing is that lithium ion batteries are stuffed full of flammable liquid," Whitacre said.
Even one-in-a-million problems with lithium ion batteries can result in many fires because there are billions of them in use now, with dozens sometimes stacked together in a single device.

Experts say lithium ion batteries are more dangerous because their electrolyte, the liquid that allows ions to move between electrodes in the battery, is more flammable than the substance in older type batteries. Those older types include the lead-acid batteries in most cars and the nickel cadmium batteries that are often in video equipment and power tools.
Still, MIT materials science and engineering professor Gerbrand Ceder and others said the safety problems can be fixed.
Change doesn't come often in the battery field.

"The big advances in battery technology happen rarely. It's been more than 200 years and we have maybe five different successful rechargeable batteries," said George Blomgren, a former senior technology researcher at Eveready and now a private battery consultant. "It's frustrating."
Alessandro Volta -- for whom the volt is named -- invented the first useful battery in 1800. That was long before other breakthrough inventions like the internal combustion engine, telephone, car, airplane, transistor, computer and Internet. But all of those developments have seemed to evolve faster than the simple battery.
The lead-acid car battery "has been around for 150 years more or less," Whitacre said. "This is a remarkable testament to first how robust that chemistry is and how difficult change is."

Battery experts are split over what's next. Some think the lithium ion battery can be tinkered with to get major efficiency and storage improvements. Amatucci said he thinks we can get two to three times more energy out of future lithium ion batteries, while others said minor chemical changes can do even more.

But just as many engineers say the lithium ion battery has run its course.
"With the materials in the current lithium ion battery, we are definitely plateaued," Blomgren said. "We're waiting for something to come along that really does the job."
There are all sorts of new type batteries being worked on: lithium-air, lithium-sulfur, magnesium, sodium-ion.

"Right now it's a horse race," Blomgren said. "There's deficiencies in every technology that's out there. Each one of them requires a major solution."
One of the nation's best hopes for a breakthrough, said Battaglia, is John Goodenough, the man responsible for the 1979 breakthrough that led the first commercial lithium ion battery in 1991. He will receive the NationalOriginal 537626-001 Medal of Science at the White House next month.
Goodenough is 90.

"I'm working on it," Goodenough, an engineering professor at the University of Texas at Austin, said Tuesday. "I'm optimistic in a sense that I'm willing to keep working on it. I think we can do some interesting things."

The problem with electrification is things like tunnels

April 13 [Sat], 2013, 11:32
If for some an intercity express will always resemble an oversized toy then this is perhaps just one stage further towards an extravagantOriginal probook 4510s childhood dream: a battery-powered train capable of travelling 600 miles on a single charge.

Such a technology is now possible, if not immediately likely to pull into a local station, according to government-commissioned research. The study was ordered by the Department for Transport with the significantly more serious purpose of examining ways trains could run on difficult-to-electrify lines if fossil fuel prices and environmental worries make diesel power too expensive.

The experts, working on behalf of the Transport Research Laboratory, looked into two options, the first of which would see a relatively small battery – still weighing up to two tonnes – with a shorter range, which would be mechanically swapped at stations.

The other notion was seen as more feasible: a single, eight-tonne battery, which could propel a train service for around 600 miles at a time, using a super capacitor or flywheel for the varying power requirements of the route.

Using digital models of real, if shorter, rail trips – Stratford-upon-Avon to Birmingham, for example – the experts were able to model how such a train could run. The conclusion – battery power is "a feasible option for providing electric traction on parts of the rail network where full route electrification is not viable".

The big caveat, one known all too well by owners of electric cars, is the lifespan of the hugely expensive battery, with the eight-tonne rail version anticipated to cost around £0.5m a piece. While a diesel train would cost around £160,000 a year to run on a daily 600-mile service, the battery version would be more than £240,000 a year, of which £150,000 alone would be set aside for battery replacement.

Diesel prices would need to more than double for battery-only trains to become viable, said John Molyneux from the rail arm of the Lloyd's Register group, who led the report.

"I don't think we'll see these trains in my lifetime," he said. "But they may eventually come, out of necessity rather than of choice. It would be because of fuel prices and the environment."

Battery technology could improve, but less quickly than some people thought, he said: "It's all relative. Lithium ion has been around for 20-odd years and there isn't much that's better than that. And it's still got its problems. With any next-generation batteries you're still limited by electro-chemistry, which is a big limitation. You can't get much better than we have now."

However, one more immediate use of the technology could be smaller batteries to propel trains through short sections of difficult-to-electrify routes.

"The problem with electrification is things like tunnels, bridges and stations," he said. "They're the killers because you've got to break the overhead and you can't have a continuous run.

"One thing we looked into was whether we could supply enough power on a small battery just to get you through the critical bits. LikeOriginal G50 an electric-electric hybrid. But there's got to be an awful lot of will driving even that."

? This article was amended on 4 February 2013 because the original standfirst incorrectly called the Department for Transport the Department of Transport. This has been corrected.

Older nickel-cadmium battery technologies

April 05 [Fri], 2013, 15:34
Older nickel-cadmium battery technologies required their owners to fully discharge (use them until they are totally dead) them before 12 cells U160recharging them, however, lithium-ion batteries are the opposite. Their lifespan (as in, how long they last before they malfunction and need replacement) decreases as you discharge them more. [Source]

Therefore, waiting until they are almost out of energy actually shortens their lifespan, and they last longest when you keep them topped up. Please read the section just above this one to learn more: State of Charge (SOC), Depth of Discharge (DOD), and Their Importance.

One of the main advantages of such a practice is that you won’t have to worry about your phone or laptop dying as much.

Where convenience is concerned, just plug your chargers into a small power strip and leave them, plug them into your phones and notebook computers every evening, and let them charge briefly, you can turn off th12 cells U330e power strip and leave everything plugged in until the next time you need the phone or laptop. They don’t consume power when the strip is turned off because it physically disconnects them from the power outlet.

Lithium-ion batteries are charged by supplying

April 05 [Fri], 2013, 15:33
Lithium-ion batteries have the lowest environmental impact, the best energy-to-weight ratio, and the longest lifespan, as well as the largest amount of cycles (which is 1000-2000 cycles) of the three most common types of 12 cells 43R9257used for electric and hybrid electric vehicles. There are many different lithium-ion battery chemistries, some of which which are very different from each other as well, these include: Lithium Iron Phosphate, Lithium Maganese, Lithium Polymer, Lithium Sulfur, and more. Read the introduction to batteries above before this section.

Lithium-ion batteries are charged by supplying them with electric current which drives the lithium-ions in the battery from the cathode to the anode. When you use these batteries to supply anything with electricity, they reverse this process and generate electricity which then powers your laptop, phone, etc. This is called discharging. If you haven’t already guessed, in this case, the lithium-ions move from the anode back to the cathode. Lithium-ion batteries do not store electricity, they generate it.

The main drawback of lithium-ion batteries is their high price. Lithium ion batteries self degrade with or without use and will eventually die. This is why people only get a few hundred cycles out of the 1,000-2,00012 cells U150 mentioned above. They financially pay you back more if you normally cycle your batteries more frequently (in other words, they pay for themselves faster if you normally use your batteries more heavily than the average person).

Efficiency of lithium-ion batteries: Upwards of 80%.

Adding RAM saves battery life

December 07 [Fri], 2012, 16:18
The tips above should lengthen the time before you need to replace your laptop's battery. But on a daily basis, we're far more concerned with another type of battery life: how long we can keep our laptop running dell Studio 1737 batterywithout AC power. You may know most of the following tips already, but it never hurts to refresh (or recharge) your memory.

Dim your screenYour laptop's backlight requires a lot of juice. Keep it as dim as you can comfortably read it.

Shut off unneeded hardwareTurn off your Bluetooth, and if you're not using the Internet, turn off your Wi-Fi receiver, as well. Don't use an external mouse or other device. And muting the PC's sound system not only saves power, it avoids annoying everyone else in the caf??.

Avoid multitaskingRun as few programs as you can get away with. If possible, stick to the one application (word processor, browser, or whatever) you're currently using, plus your antivirus and firewall in the background.

And if you're not on the Internet, you don't need those two.

Avoid multimedia Save chores like photo editing and watching old Daily Show videos for when you have AC power. And if you must listen to music, use your iPod (or similar device).

Know when to sleep and when to hibernate You need to think about when you want to save power by sending your laptop into Standby or Sleep mode, and when you want to hibernate it.

There's a difference. XP's Standby and Vista and Windows 7's Sleep modes keep your PC on, using some power, but less of it than in normal use. Hibernate saves the PC's state to the hard drive, then shuts it off entirely, so that no power is used.

On the other hand, Windows takes much longer--sometimes minutes--to go into and come out of hibernation. And those are minutes that the battery is draining heavily and you can't work.

XP's Standby mode isn't really all that efficient. If your laptop will be inactive for more than about half an hour, hibernate it. Otherwise, use Standby.

But Vista and Windows 7 do a much better job with their Sleep mode. Don't bother hibernating your PC unless you think you're going to go more than two or three hours without using it.

Myth: Adding RAM saves battery life.

True, more RAM means less hard drive access, and the hard drive uses a lot of electricity. But RAM uses electricity as well, and oiginal T112Cunless you're doing a lot of multitasking (not a good idea when you're on battery power), more RAM won't reduce hard drive use.

Juiced for more battery life tips? Check out our other battery life tips or post your favorites in the comments!

Your battery will still be useful when you're looking for a new laptop

December 07 [Fri], 2012, 16:17
This isn't, strictly speaking, the case. You can't make old lithium hold more electrons than it can currently manage.

But if the battery is running out unexpectedly fast, or if your laptop is having trouble figuring out how much power it has left, cheap Studio 1537 batteryyou might be able to fix the battery's "gas gauge," so it at least gives a more accurate reading.

If you suspect the battery can't tell if it's charged or not, run it through a couple of cycles. Drain it of all its power (yes, this is the exception to the "don't drain the battery" rule mentioned above), recharge it to 100 percent, and then repeat.

But how do you drain the battery when Windows won't let you do just that? Don't bother with the settings described above. They're not safe (you might forget to change them back), they may not be getting an accurate reading, and they quite possibly won't let you set the critical battery level to 0 percent. (If they did, it would crash Windows.)

Instead, unplug your AC power and keep your laptop running (you can work on it if you like) until it automatically hibernates. Then reboot your PC back and go directly to the system setup program.

I can't tell you exactly how to get there; each computer is different. Turn on your PC and look for an onscreen message (one of the first you'll see) that says something like "Press the X key for setup." Immediately press the designated key.

It may take a couple of times to get the timing right. If there isn't enough power to let it boot, plug in AC until you're at the setup program, then unplug it.

Leave the notebook on until it shuts off. This can take some time (45 minutes on my laptop); setup uses a lot less power than Windows.

Once the PC is off, plug in the AC power, then wait a few hours before rebooting to Windows and making sure you've got 12 cells Studio 1555 battery a full recharge.

Repeat the process once or twice.

With luck and proper care, your battery will still be useful when you're looking for a new laptop.

Lithium Ion batteries have great performance

November 09 [Fri], 2012, 16:53
I was standing in line at a local electronics store the other day when I struck up a conversation with the guy ahead of me who had a basket full of battery chargers and AA rechargeable batteries. It turns out he had decided to replace all of the batteries in his house with the rechargeable kind. Between the original Inspiron N5010 batteryand the chargers this guy plunked down over a hundred bucks!

He was so proud, telling me about all the money he was going to save.

I didn’t have the heart to ask him if he had the same typical electronic devices found in most homes, because if he did then he probably ended up spending a lot more money than he should have.

Rechargeable Batteries Aren’t Always Cost Effective!

I realize many people want to convert to rechargeable batteries for environmental reasons, which is fair enough. But the truth of the matter is this: when cost is the primary discriminator, low current-draw devices simply don’t warrant the extra expense of rechargeable batteries. That’s because the batteries of low current-draw devices are typically changed so infrequently that the payback period for equivalent rechargeable batteries would be too far long to justify the investment!

For example, it makes much more sense to use traditional alkaline batteries for low-draw devices like your wall clocks, radios, smoke detectors, programmable thermostats, and remote controls because they lose power at a much slower rate than rechargeable batteries.

And because traditional alkaline batteries can hold a charge for years when not in use, they are also the better choice for items that may sit unused for long period of time, like your alarm clock back-up battery and emergency flashlights.

When it comes right down to it, these low current-draw and/or low-use devices make up the great majority of battery-driven products in the typical home.

Okay. So When Do Rechargeable Batteries Make Sense?

Rechargeable batteries are really intended for moderate to high current-draw devices that get at least moderate use. Typically, these are devices that require a battery change every 30 to 60 days.

In my house the only item that clearly met that criteria and, therefore, justified the added up-front costs of rechargeable batteries, was the kids’ Wii gaming system. That is a perfect example of a high-use device where rechargeable batteries will save you a lot of money in the long run.

But for my household those are the only items where rechargeable batteries make sense.

“But, Len, what about my wireless keyboards and mice? Those get a lot of use!”

Well, as my article on the practicality of wireless mice and keyboards noted, rechargeable batteries didn’t even make financial sense for those devices, based upon my battery usage over an 18-month period – I only spent a little over $18 on replacement batteries during that period. But a set of eight good rechargeable AA batteries (five for the mouse and keyboard plus three spares) would set me back roughly $24. Add in the cost of the charger (a good one can run upwards of $40) and you can see that the payback period on the rechargeable batteries becomes a real issue. Remember, rechargeable batteries eventually go bad too, so you’ll need your batteries and charger to last at least until the payback period is reached if you want to recoup your costs in a reasonable amount of time.

How Do I Know Which Type of Rechargeable Battery to Buy?

If and when you decide you want to buy rechargeable batteries, you’ll need to know that there are essentially four types to choose from: nickel metal-hydride (NiMH), nickel cadmium (NiCad), rechargeable alkaline, and lithium ion.

NiMH rechargeable batteries typically perform better than NiCads and are free of toxic heavy metals. Generally speaking, NiMH is the best all-around choice for most rechargeable battery applications. As an added bonus, most NiMH battery charger systems can accommodate NiCad batteries too (although the opposite is not true).

NiCads are being phased out in favor of NiMHs not only because they are losing the performance war, but also because of their inconvenience; the heavy metals used within the NiCad are toxic and require special disposal needs.

Rechargeable alkaline batteries have only two real advantages over NiMHs and NiCads: low cost and no need for special recycling. Otherwise, their long-term performance and recharge characteristics make these batteries a poor choice. Rechargeable alkaline batteries also require a special charger, which reminds me: don’t ever confuse rechargeable alkalines with the typical disposable alkaline batteries that are sold everywhere from 99-cent stores to the local grocery market – although some people do it, those batteries cannot be safely charged.

Rechargeable alkaline batteries have only two real advantages over NiMHs and NICas:low cost and no need for special recycling.Otherwise,their long-term performance and recharger characteristics make thesern873 KM74 laptop batterya poor choice.Rechargeable alkaline batteries also require to the local grocery market-although some people do it,those batteries cannot safely charge.

Lithium Ion batteries have great performance and can go unused for long periods without losing their charge.The big drawback is their price;not only are lithium ion batteries much more expensive than other types of require to the local grocery market-although some people do it,those batteries cannot safely charge.
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